RS 500 - Advanced Rangeland Management

  • 3 credits

The emphasis of this course is linking bio-physical and human systems to ensure sustainable practices and uses. The class is designed for individuals from all backgrounds who have an interest in management of rangelands or other natural resources.

Students can expect the outcomes below from taking this course:

  • A life model for management of natural resources with emphasis on rangelands.
  • An understanding of the fundamental organizing ideas, concepts, and facts that form the basis for natural-resource decisions.
  • Application of adaptive management to sustain people and ecosystems in a changing world.

Prerequisite

One course in basic ecology.

Important Information

Registration is restricted to students admitted to the Master of Natural Resources Stewardship degree program. Contact Sonya Le Febre the week prior to the course start to inquire about registering as a non-admitted student.

Instructors

Casey Matney

cmatney@mail.colostate.edu

Casey Matney began his career in the natural resources field as a college intern for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. He completed a bachelor’s degree in Fisheries and Wildlife Management at Oregon State University (OSU) studying sage grouse at Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge and working seasonal positions for the USDA Forest Service. For his master’s degree, he studied stream temperature, redband trout, and willow herbivory on Steens Mountain. He received a Ph.D. for his research studying winterfat and grazing ecology in the Catlow Valley of Oregon. Casey is now an Assistant Professor and Agriculture/Horticulture Extension Agent within the School of Natural Resources and Extension at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

In Alaska, Casey’s program responsibilities span the spectrum from livestock and range to soils and horticulture. He is the Alaska State Coordinator for Western SARE and president of the National Association for County Agricultural Agents in Alaska. He provides agriculture expertise and training to rural Alaska villages as well as the more metropolitan areas of the state. He is a primary investigator and collaborator on a number of research and outreach projects focusing on: forage production, soil health, integrated pest management, and produce safety. Casey has been instructing college courses in rangeland management since 2006.

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