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MIP 617 - Principles of Biodefense/Emerging Pathogens

  • 3 credits

Biodefense and bioterrorism as well as emerging pathogens were the newest hot topics of research and research funding programs. Many current courses teach only minor part of these important fields, but research, industry, and public health teams need researchers and scientists with strong knowledge and experiences in these fields. 

This course will have two major topics: (1) Bioterrorism agents and (2) Emerging pathogens. This course will focus on pathogens and non-pathogens strongly involved in biodefense activities.  MIP617 will cover the most important bacteria and virus but will also cover important toxins and chemical weapons associated with modern warfare. Training in the area of biodefense and emerging pathogens, therefore, is fundamental for well-rounded employees in the life sciences and public health area.

From virus to bacteria and protozoa understanding their action to cause diseases and activities to detect, treat and/or prevent the diseases they cause is essential for today’s public health and research fields. This course will provide graduate students with an in-depth, cutting edge exposure to the subject of pathogens potentially used for bioterrorism and of emerging and re-emerging pathogens. 

Upon the completion of this course, students will be able to: 

  • Understand the different needs of the military and the public health on biodefense.
  • Be able to describe the diseases caused by biodefense pathogens. They will be able to describe various approaches to improve detection, prevention, and treatment options for diseases caused by biodefense agents.
  • Explain the importance of emerging and especially re-emerging pathogens and diseases.
  • Be able to describe the diseases behind emerging and re-emerging pathogens. They will also be able to understand the options for detection, treatment, and prevention for the emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases. 

Instructors

Dr. Casey Gries

Casey.Gries@colostate.edu