BIOM 576 - Quantitative Systems Physiology

  • 4 credits

Quantitative, model-oriented approach to cellular and systems physiology with design examples from biomedical engineering.

This course requires the use of electronic proctoring ProctorU or ProctorTrack as determined by the course faculty. The course syllabus will provide information on the approved electronic testing service. Please see http://www.online.colostate.edu/current-students/proctoring.dot for detailed instructions. For students requiring accommodations, please contact Resources for Disabled Students (RDS); for consideration of exceptions outside the scope of RDS, please contact the University Testing Center.

This course can be applied towards:

Prerequisite

BMS 300 (Principles of Human Physiology); CHEM 113 (General Chemistry II); MATH 340 (Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations); PH 142 (Physics for Scientists and Engineers II (GT-SC1)). Credit not allowed for both BIOM 576 and MECH 576.

Important Information

Military personnel admitted to a College of Engineering online degree program may be eligible for a 15% tuition discount. Tuition discounts can only be given if you provide the appropriate discount code at the time of registration. Call (877) 491-4336 or email csu_online_registration@mail.colostate.edu to learn more.

Instructors

Zhijie Wang
Zhijie Wang

Zhijie.Wang@colostate.edu

Dr. Zhijie Wang received her BS degrees, in biomedical engineering from Zhejiang University (Hangzhou, China), and MS and PhD degrees in mechanical engineering from the State University of New York at Buffalo. Dr. Wang conducted her postdoctoral studies and then became a non-tenure track research faculty at University of Wisconsin - Madison in the biomedical engineering department. Since fall 2016, Dr. Wang has been a tenure-track assistant professor in the department of mechanical engineering and school of biomedical engineering at CSU, where she directs the cardiovascular biomechanics (CVB) laboratory specializing in ex vivo and in vivo cardiovascular and pulmonary mechanical/hemodynamic measurements at multiple scales. Dr. Wang’s research area includes the investigation of cardiopulmonary biomechanical mechanisms in pulmonary vascular diseases, soft tissue biomechanics such as viscoelasticity, and regenerative medicine in right heart failure. Dr. Wang has taught Quantitative Systems Physiology, which is a course given every spring semester in both the BIOM and MECH curricula (BIOM/MECH 576) and available for resident students and distance learning students.

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