BIOM 526 - Biological Physics

  • 3 credits

Mathematical and physical modeling of biological systems. Mass transport in cellular environments. Electrical/mechanical properties of biomolecules.

This course has print-based exams that require a proctor. Exams may be taken at the University Testing Center at Colorado State University, or at an accredited College or University Testing Center in your area. To request to take your exam at an accredited testing site in your area, please submit a Proctor Identification Form at least two weeks prior to the first exam in the course.

This course can be applied towards:

Prerequisite

MATH 340 (Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations) or MATH 345 (Differential Equations); PH 122 (General Physics II) or PH 142 (Physics for Scientists and Engineers II (GT-SC1)). Credit not allowed for both BIOM 526 and ECE 526.

Important Information

Military personnel admitted to a College of Engineering online degree program may be eligible for a 15% tuition discount. Tuition discounts can only be given if you provide the appropriate discount code at the time of registration. Call (877) 491-4336 or email csu_online_registration@mail.colostate.edu to learn more.

Textbook and Materials

Textbooks and materials can be purchased at the CSU Bookstore unless otherwise indicated.

Required

  • Biological Physics: Energy, Information, Life (2008)
    P. Nelson, Freeman

Instructors

Diego Krapf

(970) 491-4255 | Diego.Krapf@colostate.edu

Diego Krapf was born in Rosario, Argentina. During his Ph.D. research he worked on infrared optics on nanostructured materials. Then, Dr. Krapf joined the research group of Prof. Cees Dekker in the Netherlands where he focused on single-molecule biophysics using solid-state nanopores. Since August 2007, he has served as a faculty member in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Colorado State University. Dr. Krapf is also an associate professor in the School of Biomedical Engineering. His current research interests include cellular biophysics at the single-molecule level, with particular emphasis on membrane and cytoskeleton dynamics.

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