Electrical Engineering Master of Engineering (M.E.) – Electrical Engineering Specialization
Master of Science (M.S.) in Electrical Engineering

Career Opportunities

Electrical engineers are in demand across virtually every industry, allowing you to pair your passion with this advanced education. Designed with input from industry leaders, the electrical engineering curriculum has been designed to meet modern workforce needs and has the flexibility to evolve as job sectors continue to shift.

The demand for electrical engineering jobs increases as technology advances. Global competition for jobs and specific sectors is becoming more competitive and global collaboration is more commonplace than ever.

What can you do with an electrical engineering degree?

The online master's programs prepare students for a wide-variety of electrical engineering careers in diverse industries, including, but not limited to:

  • Power and energy
  • Space and aerospace
  • Government and military sectors
  • Healthcare systems
  • Communication equipment and hardware manufacturing
  • Computer networks, information systems, and cyber security
  • Natural resources and the environment
  • Biosciences, biomedical engineering, and health sciences

Electrical Engineering Jobs Outlook

Electrical Engineering Master's graduates are consistently in the top five most coveted degrees for employment according to the latest National Association of Colleges and Employers Job Outlook report.

Engineering and computer occupations are expected to account for 82.7% of total growth in science and engineering occupations between 2012-2022. (Source: U.S. Science and Engineering Workforce: Recent, Current, and Projected Employment, Wages, and Unemployment, Feb 2014)

Electrical engineers are consistently listed at the top of the salary range with incomes of $95k-$129k for mid-career professionals, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics and Payscale.com.

What Next?

  • Learn more about being a student in this program, including information about course structure, assignments, time commitments, and interaction with peers and faculty.

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